Aircraft Cleaning and Washing Basics – The Do’s and Don’ts of Air Craft Wash Procedures

If you are in the aerospace industry and have been laid off, then you might consider starting your own business and perhaps you want to start a business that has to do with aircraft cleaning. Aircraft washing can be a very rewarding business and if you do it right, you could in fact, make some money at it.

Of course, like any business it is not that easy. So, let's discuss some of the issues you will need to address. In the short interview below you will hear the words of an expert aircraft washer, so let's begin; what questions do you have?

For starters, I was wanting to know the basic do's & don'ts of aircraft washing?

Well, I'd recommend you call Jet Stream Products in Dallas, as they have manuals and training and they also sell supplies, soaps, and equipment as well. When learning how to wash and clean airplanes, there are many things that are quite different than the cleaning of other objects like cars and trucks for instance.

What about actual washing or spraying of aircraft; for example, not spraying directly on the aircraft windows?

If the pressure is low it's not such a big deal, but most of the little aircraft do leak. Under no circumstances should you use 180 degree steam cleaner settings on Plexiglas side windows of small private little aircraft.

Is this for all aircraft, or just pressurized cabins?

These are entirely, two different animals. Little Cessna's and Piper's leak around the windows, and there is nothing worse than getting water and moisture inside of an aircraft, it stinks them up pretty badly. Pressurized aircraft do not leak, but that does not mean you want to go full pressure on the windows to get them to leak either. Also the more high performance the front windscreens are no longer Plexiglas, so it's more like a car.

Source by Lance Winslow

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