Jetstar Airways Airbus A320 Adelaide to Darwin [AirClips full flight series]

Jetstar Airways Pty Ltd, trading as Jetstar, is an Australian low-cost airline headquartered in Melbourne, Australia. It is a wholly owned subsidiary of Qantas, created in response to the threat posed by low-cost airline Virgin Blue. Jetstar is part of Qantas' two brand strategy of having Qantas Airways for the premium full-service market and Jetstar for the low-cost market.
The airline operates an extensive domestic network as well as regional and international services from its main base at Melbourne Airport, using a mixed fleet of Airbus A320 family, Airbus A330 and Boeing 787 Dreamliner aircraft. Like its Qantas parent, Jetstar competes with Virgin Australia and its fully owned low-cost subsidiary Tigerair Australia.
Qantas also has stakes in sister airlines Jetstar Asia Airways, Valuair, Jetstar Pacific Airlines, Jetstar Japan and Jetstar Hong Kong.
From 1 February 2011, Jetstar started its co-operation with the oneworld alliance, allowing people booking an itinerary with a full oneworld member to include a Jetstar flight in the itinerary. However, the flight must be sold via Jetstar's corporate parent Qantas, under a QF flight number.
In August 2011, Jetstar's parent Qantas announced that it will set up a new airline to be called Jetstar Japan, a joint venture of Jetstar, Japan Airlines, and Mitsubishi. The airline was expected to start operating in December 2012, but now plans to launch ahead of schedule on 3 July 2012.
In March 2012, another Asian Jetstar branded airline was announced, Jetstar Hong Kong, a strategic partnership between Qantas and China Eastern Airlines, which is expected to commence operations in 2013.
In November 2013, Jetstar moved its head office from Melbourne's CBD to the suburb of Collingwood. in December 2013, Jetstar announced that it would be closing its Darwin base in May 2014 and re-positioning its aircraft in Adelaide. Flights to Tokyo via Manila were cancelled while services to Singapore would be operated by Jetstar Asia with Singapore-based aircraft. The base closure was attributed to cost cutting measures by parent company Qantas as well as increased competition from re-introduction of flights by Asian carriers into Darwin airport. In February 2014, Jetstar signed a codeshare agreement with Emirates Airlines as a continuation of the agreement of its parent company with Emirates.

When Airbus designed the Airbus A300 during the late 1960s and early 1970s, it envisaged a broad family of airliners with which to compete against Boeing and Douglas, two established US aerospace manufacturers. From the moment of formation, Airbus had begun studies into derivatives of the Airbus A300B in support of this long-term goal. Prior to the service introduction of the first Airbus airliners, engineers within Airbus had identified nine possible variations of the A300 known as A300B1 to B9. A 10th variation, conceived in 1973, later the first to be constructed, was designated the A300B10. It was a smaller aircraft which would be developed into the long-range Airbus A310. Airbus then focused its efforts on the single-aisle market, which was dominated by the Boeing 737 and McDonnell Douglas DC-9.
Plans from a number of European aircraft manufacturers called for a successor to the relatively successful BAC One-Eleven, and to replace the Boeing 737-200 and DC-9.[15] Germany's MBB (Messerschmitt-Bölkow-Blohm), British Aircraft Corporation, Sweden's Saab and Spain's CASA worked on the EUROPLANE, a 180- to 200-seat aircraft. It was abandoned after intruding on A310 specifications.VFW-Fokker, Dornier and Hawker Siddeley worked on a number of 150-seat designs.
Alongside BAe (which at the time was not part of Airbus) were MBB, Fokker-VFW and Aérospatiale. The design within the JET study that was carried forward was the JET2 (163 passengers), which then became the Airbus S.A1/2/3 series (Single Aisle), before settling on the A320 name for its launch in 1984.
The Hawker Siddeley team had previously produced a design called the HS.134 "Airbus" in 1965, an evolution of the HS.121 (formerly DH.121) Trident, which shared much of the general arrangement of the later JET3 study design. The name "Airbus" at the time referred to a BEA requirement, rather than to the later international programme.


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