The Federal Aviation Regulations



The Federal Aviation Regulations, or FARs, is part of the Code of Federal Regulations. The FARs details what can or can not be done in the skies of the United States. It applies to airline pilots, hot air ballooners, remote control aircraft hobbyist or rocket flyer.

FARs are in place to push for safety in the skies by providing regulations that protect the pilots, passenger and the public in general from possible dangers from flying crafts. The FARs have been expanded after the 9/11 attacks so it can provide more protection in terms of national security.

The FARs started out in 1926 with the passing of the Air Commerce Act of May 20. It placed the government in control of issuing and enforcing air traffic rules. It also gave the government power to grant pilot licenses and aircraft certificates.

The following decades after 1926 saw the growth of the aviation industry. The US Federal Government's role increased and new government bodies were established. The Civil Aeronautics Adminstration or CAA was established in 1940 as well as the Civil Aeronautics Board or CAB. The Federal Aviation Agency or the FAA was established in 1958 and later became the Federal Aviation Administration in 1966.

How The FARs Are Organized

The FARs, being just a part of the Code of Federal Regulations, still has hundreds of sections normally referred to as simply "parts". Eact part discusses a specific aviation or aviation-related activity. A big part of these parts are focused on flight school certification, pilot cetification and aircraft certification.

When you board a commercial airplane, you'll be subjected to a mandatory safety presentation. You'll need to know that the pilot in command of the aircraft has the final authority as granted by the FARs. The pilot exercises this authority during emergency situations when quick decisions are required to handle the situation.



Source by Adrian Beltran

This entry was posted in Trade Flights Australia. Bookmark the permalink.