Titanium Use in Airplane Parts

Titanium is a useful material for constructing airplane parts for many reasons. For one, titanium is an alloy metal that is extremely light. For aircraft, this quality is critical as the aircraft must be light enough to lift from the ground without requiring more powerful (and bigger) engines to propel it. Titanium's strength is also critical as aircraft experience harsh conditions and high work loads. In all, titanium is just what the doctor ordered for the large majority of fabricated sub-assemblies, which necessitate a low weight, long service life and high strength.

Titanium is able to endure numerous types of damage with little impact on the metal alloy itself. Titanium is able to hold up under heat and chemicals will not cause damage to the external composition of titanium. Environmental exposures do not break down titanium, even over long periods of time. Industrial damage will not affect the external structure. Furthermore, corrosive contaminants are not a concern when it comes to titanium products.

When specifically considering airplane engines, titanium proves to be an invaluable asset. Beginning in the 1980s, internal titanium sub-components have been used in airplane engines successfully. This amazing metal has been applied in the making of many engine parts including impellers, turbine stators, thrust outlet sheaths, typical rotating and static engine parts, compression disks and bearings. This alloy is typically applied in areas that require an exceptionally high strength, significant durability and low weight. These are critical elements, which must be considered when building an aircraft.

Another imperative area that requires great strength combined with light weight is the wing. Wing components are often comprised of titanium. In general, titanium is utilized when fabricating internal sub-assemblies which are capable of accommodating especially high flight loads. Titanium is also often used in the internal structure of the wing, particularly in wing boxes or wing spars related to the variable airfoil designs. In such a case, usual loads connected with static wing configurations are considerably magnified.

It is simple to understand the attraction of the use of titanium when constructing aircraft. Because of the many qualities of titanium, both airplane safety and performance are improved through the use of this magnificent material. Many modern designs feature titanium in the construction, if not overly than within the inner mechanisms of the aircraft itself. Airplane owners and passengers alike benefit, thanks to the strength and light weight factors that titanium possesses that help make aircraft perform better as well as be safer.

Source by Mike Allin

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